Conference Contribution Details
Mandatory Fields
Kelly, M; O'Flynn, S Bennett,D; Joy, A; O'Rourke,M
AMEE 2011 Vienna
Does professionalism decline over the course of medical education? Professionalism profiling using quantitative tools in an integrated medical curriculum
Vienna
Oral Presentation
2011
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0
Optional Fields


4I1
(University College Cork, Medical Education Unit, Cork,
Ireland)

Does professionalism decline over the course
of medical education? Professionalism profiling using
quantitative tools in an integrated medical curriculum

Background: Research has shown that professionalism
declines over the course of undergraduate training.
Recent curriculum reform should stem such trends.

Summary of work: To measure student attitudes to
professionalism; specifically teamwork, empathy, lifelong
learning and reflective practice, following the
introduction of an integrated curriculum. All students in
Year 1-5, of a 5 year program and Year 2-3 of 4 year
graduate entry completed a series of validated
questionnaires. This included Jefferson Scale of
Physician Empathy, Jefferson Scale of Physician Lifelong
Learning, Self-reflection and insight scale & Readiness
for Inter-professional Learning Scale (RIPLS). Data was
analyzed in SPSS.

Summary of results: Our response rate was 73% (487).
54% of the respondents were female. Age range is 17
40 years. Irish students accounted for 55% of the
sample. The mean empathy score was 97.56 (range 57-
114, SD 6.79); the mean life-long learning score was
43.85 (range 28-56,SD5.01), the mean RIPLS score was
78.33 (range 23-94, SD9.24). There is no significant
deterioration in empathy score between year 1 to year
5. The lifelong learning scores increased significantly
between year one and year 5 (p<0.001). The RIPLS
declined significantly (p<0.01) between year 1 and year
5.

Conclusions: Quantitative measures of professionalism
varied throughout the course, emphasising the
complex nature of professionalism.

4I2 Medical Professionalism in Relations: