Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
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Barrett, E.,Guinane, C. M.,Ryan, C. A.,Dempsey, E. M.,Murphy, B. P.,O'Toole, P. W.,Fitzgerald, G. F.,Cotter, P. D.,Ross, R. P.,Stanton, C.
2013
April
Microbiota diversity and stability of the preterm neonatal ileum and colon of two infants
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22
215
25215
The composition of the microbiota associated with the human ileum and colon in the early weeks of life of two preterm infants was examined, with particular emphasis on the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium members. Culturing work showed that bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the ileostomy changed over time, compared with the colostomy effluent where there was far less variation. The colostomy infant was dominated by two phyla, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes, while in the ileostomy samples, Proteobacteria emerged at the expense of Actinobacteria. Bacteroidetes were only detected following the reversal of the ileostomy in the final fecal sample and were not detected in any colonic fluid samples. Clostridia levels were unstable in the colostomy fluid, suggesting that the ileostomy/colostomy itself influenced the gut microbiota, in particular the strict anaerobes. Pyrosequencing analysis of microbiota composition indicated that bifidobacteria and lactobacilli are among the dominant genera in both the ileal and colonic fluids. Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli levels were unstable in the ileostomy fluid, with large reductions in numbers and relative proportions of both observed. These decreases were characterized by an increase in proportions of Streptococcus and Enterobacteriaceae. Clostridium was detected only in the colonic effluent, with large changes in the relative proportions over time.The composition of the microbiota associated with the human ileum and colon in the early weeks of life of two preterm infants was examined, with particular emphasis on the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium members. Culturing work showed that bifidobacteria and lactobacilli in the ileostomy changed over time, compared with the colostomy effluent where there was far less variation. The colostomy infant was dominated by two phyla, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes, while in the ileostomy samples, Proteobacteria emerged at the expense of Actinobacteria. Bacteroidetes were only detected following the reversal of the ileostomy in the final fecal sample and were not detected in any colonic fluid samples. Clostridia levels were unstable in the colostomy fluid, suggesting that the ileostomy/colostomy itself influenced the gut microbiota, in particular the strict anaerobes. Pyrosequencing analysis of microbiota composition indicated that bifidobacteria and lactobacilli are among the dominant genera in both the ileal and colonic fluids. Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli levels were unstable in the ileostomy fluid, with large reductions in numbers and relative proportions of both observed. These decreases were characterized by an increase in proportions of Streptococcus and Enterobacteriaceae. Clostridium was detected only in the colonic effluent, with large changes in the relative proportions over time.
2045-8827 (Electronic) 20
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23349073http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23349073
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