Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Corcoran, P.,Keeley, H. S.,O'Sullivan, M.,Perry, I. J.
2003
September
Parasuicide and suicide in the south-west of Ireland
Validated
()
Optional Fields
172
33
107
BACKGROUND: Suicidal behaviour has become recognised as a major public health problem. AIM: To examine hospital-treated parasuicide and suicide in the Southern and Mid-Western Health Boards. METHODS: Parasuicide data were derived from independent data collection in general and psychiatric hospitals and prisons between 1995 and 1997. The corresponding suicide data were obtained electronically from the Central Statistics Office. RESULTS: Respectively, the annual person-based male, female and total European age-standardised rates were 128.9, 154.3 and 141.3 per 100,000 for parasuicide compared to 22.7, 5.5 and 14.1 per 100,000 for suicide. The parasuicide/suicide ratio varied markedly by age, gender, area and marital status. The majority of suicides were by hanging or drowning whereas drug overdose made up the vast majority of parasuicide acts. Parasuicide was largely a city phenomenon confined to the young of both genders whereas suicide was a significant problem for city and county men, especially young adult men. CONCLUSION: There are striking differences between the patterns of fatal and non-fatal suicidal behaviour in Ireland, which should be considered in prevention initiatives.BACKGROUND: Suicidal behaviour has become recognised as a major public health problem. AIM: To examine hospital-treated parasuicide and suicide in the Southern and Mid-Western Health Boards. METHODS: Parasuicide data were derived from independent data collection in general and psychiatric hospitals and prisons between 1995 and 1997. The corresponding suicide data were obtained electronically from the Central Statistics Office. RESULTS: Respectively, the annual person-based male, female and total European age-standardised rates were 128.9, 154.3 and 141.3 per 100,000 for parasuicide compared to 22.7, 5.5 and 14.1 per 100,000 for suicide. The parasuicide/suicide ratio varied markedly by age, gender, area and marital status. The majority of suicides were by hanging or drowning whereas drug overdose made up the vast majority of parasuicide acts. Parasuicide was largely a city phenomenon confined to the young of both genders whereas suicide was a significant problem for city and county men, especially young adult men. CONCLUSION: There are striking differences between the patterns of fatal and non-fatal suicidal behaviour in Ireland, which should be considered in prevention initiatives.
0021-1265 (Print) 0021-12
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14700110http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14700110
Grant Details