Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Kelleher, M. J.,Keeley, H. S.,Corcoran, P.
1997
November
The service implications of regional differences in suicide rates in the Republic of Ireland
Validated
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Optional Fields
90
77
262
4262
This paper examines variations in suicide within the Republic of Ireland in order to determine if the services, as currently available, require redistribution. The rates of suicide and undetermined death in the four provinces, 26 counties and five cities of Ireland are examined for the years 1976 to 1994, with the age and gender distributions of local populations taken into consideration. Marked variations between areas are noted with a threefold difference between the counties with the highest and lowest rates. Counties tend to be similarly ranked for men and women but the male suicide rate, overall, was almost three times that for women. The male:female ratio was 2.3:1 for the first half of the study, but this increased to 3.4:1 for the second half; a reflection of increasing numbers of male suicides. Surprisingly, the male suicide rate in Dublin city has stayed steady at 12 per 100,000 over the entire study period, while the national male rate has more than doubled reaching approximately 18 per 100,000 in recent years. There is a need for improved services in rural Ireland. If the various available services are to help reduce the suicide rate, then a mechanism must be found to deliver these in areas of low population density where the need could well be greatest.This paper examines variations in suicide within the Republic of Ireland in order to determine if the services, as currently available, require redistribution. The rates of suicide and undetermined death in the four provinces, 26 counties and five cities of Ireland are examined for the years 1976 to 1994, with the age and gender distributions of local populations taken into consideration. Marked variations between areas are noted with a threefold difference between the counties with the highest and lowest rates. Counties tend to be similarly ranked for men and women but the male suicide rate, overall, was almost three times that for women. The male:female ratio was 2.3:1 for the first half of the study, but this increased to 3.4:1 for the second half; a reflection of increasing numbers of male suicides. Surprisingly, the male suicide rate in Dublin city has stayed steady at 12 per 100,000 over the entire study period, while the national male rate has more than doubled reaching approximately 18 per 100,000 in recent years. There is a need for improved services in rural Ireland. If the various available services are to help reduce the suicide rate, then a mechanism must be found to deliver these in areas of low population density where the need could well be greatest.
0332-3102 (Print) 0332-31
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10036818http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10036818
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