Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Desmond, A. N.,Shanahan, F.
2012
March
Irish Journal of Medical Science
Managing chronic disease in Ireland: hospital admission rates and clinical outcomes in a large ulcerative colitis population
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181
11
65
71
Background Health care planning demands a detailed knowledge of the course of chronic diseases in the Irish population. This study describes hospital admission rates, medication use and outcomes in a large cohort of patients with ulcerative colitis attending a tertiary referral centre in Ireland. Method Four hundred and twenty-four patients who attended during the 18-year period from January 1991 to January 2009 were identified. Baseline demographics, hospital admission, medications required, extent of colitis and date of colectomy were recorded. Results More than half (55.4%) of the patients were managed exclusively in an outpatient setting throughout diagnosis and follow-up. Systemic corticosteroids, thiopurines and infliximab were required by 70, 29.5 and 5% of the patients, respectively. Overall 5-year colectomy rate due to failure of medical therapy was 15.8%. Independent predictors of colectomy were hospital admission at first presentation (odds ratio 3.6, p < 0.0001) and pancolitis at diagnosis (odds ratio 2.3, p < 0.01). Conclusions The majority of patients with colitis have an uncomplicated disease course and do not require thiopurines, biologic agents or hospital admission. Principal management at a primary care level may be appropriate in many cases. Colectomy rates at a specialist centre in Ireland compare favourably with international figures.Background Health care planning demands a detailed knowledge of the course of chronic diseases in the Irish population. This study describes hospital admission rates, medication use and outcomes in a large cohort of patients with ulcerative colitis attending a tertiary referral centre in Ireland. Method Four hundred and twenty-four patients who attended during the 18-year period from January 1991 to January 2009 were identified. Baseline demographics, hospital admission, medications required, extent of colitis and date of colectomy were recorded. Results More than half (55.4%) of the patients were managed exclusively in an outpatient setting throughout diagnosis and follow-up. Systemic corticosteroids, thiopurines and infliximab were required by 70, 29.5 and 5% of the patients, respectively. Overall 5-year colectomy rate due to failure of medical therapy was 15.8%. Independent predictors of colectomy were hospital admission at first presentation (odds ratio 3.6, p < 0.0001) and pancolitis at diagnosis (odds ratio 2.3, p < 0.01). Conclusions The majority of patients with colitis have an uncomplicated disease course and do not require thiopurines, biologic agents or hospital admission. Principal management at a primary care level may be appropriate in many cases. Colectomy rates at a specialist centre in Ireland compare favourably with international figures.
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://WOS:000303540500013://WOS:000303540500013
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