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Bernstein, C. N.,Artinian, L.,Anton, P. A.,Shanahan, F.
1994
August
Dig Dis Scidig Dis Sci
Low-dose 6-mercaptopurine in inflammatory bowel disease is associated with minimal hematologic toxicity
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39
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41
A feared complication of therapy with 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) is myelosuppression. To evaluate whether rigorous blood count monitoring is necessary, we prospectively followed the hematologic profiles of 57 patients with inflammatory bowel disease who were treated with low-dose 6-MP. Most patients (97%) were treated initially with a single dose of 50 mg/day and 79% never used more than 50 mg/day. Blood counts were obtained at weekly intervals over the first month, every two weeks for the second month, and monthly thereafter in the first year. Sixteen (28%) developed mild leukopenia (white blood count < 4.5 x 10(3)/mm3). No patient had a white blood cell count < 2.8 x 10(3)/mm3 and no patient developed leukopenia prior to three months of treatment. In only five patients did the leukopenia prompt a change in 6-mercaptopurine dose. Very mild thrombocytopenia (platelet count of < 145 x 10(3)/mm3) developed in three (5%) and macrocytosis (mean cell volume > 101 fl) was seen in nine (16%). In conclusion, leukopenia was not uncommon in patients treated with low-dose 6-MP, but was not clinically significant. Leukopenia occurred no earlier than three months and as late as 42 months into therapy. Thrombocytopenia was uncommon, mild, and was not associated with apparent bleeding. Macrocytosis may occur in the absence of vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies. Patients can be spared from weekly blood count monitoring when using low-dose 6-mercaptopurine treatment.A feared complication of therapy with 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) is myelosuppression. To evaluate whether rigorous blood count monitoring is necessary, we prospectively followed the hematologic profiles of 57 patients with inflammatory bowel disease who were treated with low-dose 6-MP. Most patients (97%) were treated initially with a single dose of 50 mg/day and 79% never used more than 50 mg/day. Blood counts were obtained at weekly intervals over the first month, every two weeks for the second month, and monthly thereafter in the first year. Sixteen (28%) developed mild leukopenia (white blood count < 4.5 x 10(3)/mm3). No patient had a white blood cell count < 2.8 x 10(3)/mm3 and no patient developed leukopenia prior to three months of treatment. In only five patients did the leukopenia prompt a change in 6-mercaptopurine dose. Very mild thrombocytopenia (platelet count of < 145 x 10(3)/mm3) developed in three (5%) and macrocytosis (mean cell volume > 101 fl) was seen in nine (16%). In conclusion, leukopenia was not uncommon in patients treated with low-dose 6-MP, but was not clinically significant. Leukopenia occurred no earlier than three months and as late as 42 months into therapy. Thrombocytopenia was uncommon, mild, and was not associated with apparent bleeding. Macrocytosis may occur in the absence of vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies. Patients can be spared from weekly blood count monitoring when using low-dose 6-mercaptopurine treatment.
0163-2116 (Print) 0163-21
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