Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
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Cronin, C. C.,Feighery, A.,Ferriss, J. B.,Liddy, C.,Shanahan, F.,Feighery, C.
1997
December
American Journal of Gastroenterology
High prevalence of celiac disease among patients with insulin-dependent (type I) diabetes mellitus
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92
12
2210
2212
OBJECTIVES: Diagnosis of unrecognized celiac disease is potentially important. The prevalence of celiac disease in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is uncertain. We report the prevalence of celiac disease in a stratified random sample (n = 101) of adult insulin-dependent diabetic patients (age, 18-59 yr) attending our clinic, and in an age- and sex-matched control group (n = 51). METHODS: Screening was by anti-endomysial antibody, measured by indirect immunofluorescence using sections of human umbilical cord. RESULTS: Celiac disease had not been suspected in any patient at the time of screening. Eight patients tested positive for anti-endomysial antibody, all of whom had a distal duodenal biopsy performed. Five patients had histologic evidence of celiac disease. One patient with negative histology was receiving immunosuppressive therapy for a renal-pancreas transplant. Of the five patients with abnormal histology, two improved on gluten restriction, one was unable to comply, one refused treatment, and one was lost to follow-up. No control subject tested positive for endomysial antibody. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes have an increased prevalence of celiac disease. Because most cases are clinically unrecognized, consideration should be given to screening all insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients with endomysial antibodies.OBJECTIVES: Diagnosis of unrecognized celiac disease is potentially important. The prevalence of celiac disease in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is uncertain. We report the prevalence of celiac disease in a stratified random sample (n = 101) of adult insulin-dependent diabetic patients (age, 18-59 yr) attending our clinic, and in an age- and sex-matched control group (n = 51). METHODS: Screening was by anti-endomysial antibody, measured by indirect immunofluorescence using sections of human umbilical cord. RESULTS: Celiac disease had not been suspected in any patient at the time of screening. Eight patients tested positive for anti-endomysial antibody, all of whom had a distal duodenal biopsy performed. Five patients had histologic evidence of celiac disease. One patient with negative histology was receiving immunosuppressive therapy for a renal-pancreas transplant. Of the five patients with abnormal histology, two improved on gluten restriction, one was unable to comply, one refused treatment, and one was lost to follow-up. No control subject tested positive for endomysial antibody. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes have an increased prevalence of celiac disease. Because most cases are clinically unrecognized, consideration should be given to screening all insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients with endomysial antibodies.
0002-9270 (Print)0002-92
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