Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Aherne, SA;Jiwan, MA;Daly, T;O'Brien, NM
2009
December
Plant Foods For Human Nutrition
Geographical Location has Greater Impact on Carotenoid Content and Bioaccessibility from Tomatoes than Variety
Validated
WOS: 29 ()
Optional Fields
BETA-CAROTENE ANTIOXIDANT CAPACITY CHERRY TOMATOES VITAMIN-E VEGETABLES LYCOPENE BIOAVAILABILITY LUTEIN FRUITS FRESH
64
250
256
The suggested health benefits of consuming tomatoes and tomato-based products have been attributed, in part, to the carotenoids present in these foods. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were to (i) analyse carotenoid content and bioaccessibility from different tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) types namely cherry, plum, round, and certain tomatoes-on-the-vine; and (ii) determine if geographical location (Ireland vs Spain) influenced the content and bioaccessibility of carotenoids in tomatoes of the same variety. Carotenoid bioaccessibility is defined as the amount of ingested carotenoids that, after digestion, are available for absorption by intestinal cells. Differences were seen in carotenoid content and bioaccessibility between the different tomato types tested. For instance, Irish round high-lycopene tomatoes contained the greatest amounts of lycopene and lutein but lowest levels of beta-carotene compared with the other Irish tomatoes. Furthermore, the content and bioaccessibility of carotenoids that were sourced from Ireland and Spain also varied greatly. Spanish tomatoes were generally superior in the content, bioaccessibility, and micelle content of carotenoids. To conclude, our findings suggest that geographical location, rather than the type of tomato, seems to have a more pronounced effect on carotenoid bioaccessibility from tomatoes.
DORDRECHT
0921-9668
10.1007/s11130-009-0136-x
Grant Details