Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Cappuccio, FP;Bell, R;Perry, IJ;Gilg, J;Ueland, PM;Refsurn, H;Sagnella, GA;Jeffery, S;Cook, DG
2002
September
Atherosclerosis
Homocysteine levels in men and women of different ethnic and cultural background living in England
Validated
WOS: 49 ()
Optional Fields
CORONARY HEART-DISEASE CARDIOVASCULAR RISK-FACTORS METHYLENETETRAHYDROFOLATE REDUCTASE COBALAMIN DEFICIENCY WANDSWORTH HEART ARTERY DISEASE PLASMA HOMOCYST(E)INE POLYMORPHISM ASIANS
164
95
102
This population-based cross-sectional study in South London looks at the total homocysteine (tHcy) levels in groups of different ethnic background and the possible role of environmental factors and the 677C --> T genetic polymorphism of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). Fasting plasma tHcy was measured in 1392 men and women, age 40-59 years; 475 were white, 465 of African origin (of whom 180 were West Africans and 280 Caribbeans) and 452 South Asian (of whom 222 were Hindus and 167 Muslims). The homozygous MTHFR TT variant had observed frequencies of 0.10 in whites, 0.01 in people of African origin and 0.02 in South Asians (P < 0.001). tHcy levels were 16% (95% CI 8-26) higher amongst TT than CC. tHcy levels were 25% (21-29) higher in men than women. Levels were significantly higher in South Asians than whites (8% [3-13]). Vegetarians had higher levels than non-vegetarians (25% [18-33]). These differences were present after adjustments for age, sex, smoking, body mass index (BMI), MTHFR 677C &RARR; T polymorphism and socio-economic status. Compared with whites (10.0 [9.7-10.3] μmol/l), and allowing for confounders, Hindus had significantly higher levels of tHcy (12.1 [11.6-12.6] μmol/l). This difference was attenuated by the inclusion of vegetarianism in the model (11.3 [10.8-11.9] μmol/l). In contrast Muslims had similar tHcy levels to whites while both West Africans and Caribbeans had slightly lower levels, though differences were not significant. The reported higher levels of tHcy in South Asians are due to high levels amongst Hindus only. They are in part accounted for by their vegetarianism. These differences in tHcy are large enough to be important contributors to the risk of vascular disease and may be preventable by simple targeted population strategies. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
CLARE
0021-9150
Grant Details