Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
O'Shea, E;Timmons, S;Kennelly, S;de Siun, A;Gallagher, P;O'Neill, D
2015
December
Journal Of Geriatric Psychiatry And Neurology
Symptom Assessment for a Palliative Care Approach in People With Dementia Admitted to Acute Hospitals: Results From a National Audit
Validated
Optional Fields
OF-LIFE CARE NURSING-HOME END MANAGEMENT PAIN PATIENT
28
255
259
Context: As the prevalence of dementia increases, more people will need dementia palliative and end-of-life (EOL) care in acute hospitals. Published literature suggests that good quality care is not always provided. Objective: To evaluate the prescription of antipsychotics and performance of multidisciplinary assessments relevant to palliative care for people with dementia, including those at EOL, during hospital admission. Method: As part of a national audit of dementia care, 660 case notes were reviewed across 35 acute hospitals. Results: In the entire cohort, many assessments essential to dementia palliative care were not performed. Of the total sample, 76 patients died, were documented to be receiving EOL care, and/or were referred for specialist palliative care. In this cohort, even less symptom assessment was performed (eg, no pain assessment in 27%, no delirium screening in 68%, and no mood or behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia in 93%). In all, 37% had antipsychotic drugs during their admission and 71% of these received a new prescription in hospital, most commonly for agitation. Conclusion: This study suggests a picture of poor symptom assessment and possible inappropriate prescription of antipsychotic medication, including at EOL, hindering the planning and delivery of effective dementia palliative care in acute hospitals.
THOUSAND OAKS
0891-9887
10.1177/0891988715588835
Grant Details