Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Wood, TK;Sullivan, AM;McDermott, KW
2003
January
Journal of Neurocytology
Viability of dopaminergic neurones is influenced by serum and astroglial cells in vitro
Validated
WOS: 9 ()
Optional Fields
PARKINSONS-DISEASE NEURAL TRANSPLANTATION SURVIVAL RAT ASTROCYTE DEATH INCREASE DEPRIVATION MECHANISMS CULTURES
32
97
103
Transplantation of embryonic nigral grafts into the striatum of Parkinson's disease patients is not optimal, mainly due to low survival of grafted neurones. Current strategies focus on enhancing neuronal survival by transplanting enriched neuronal cell populations. There is growing evidence for the importance of astroglia in neuronal survival. To characterise the effects of glial cells on dopaminergic neurones, 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine was added to embryonic rat ventral mesencephalic cultures in the presence or absence of serum. The survival and morphology of glial fibrillary acidic protein immunopositive astroglia and tyrosine hydroxylase immunopositive dopaminergic neurones was examined. In serum-containing medium, astroglial cells predominated and 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine had no significant effect on either astroglia or dopaminergic neurone survival. In serum- free medium, astroglial growth was attenuated and numbers were significantly lower in 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine treated compared with untreated cultures. There was no significant difference in the numbers of dopaminergic neurones between 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine treated and untreated cultures. However, by the eighth day in vitro, there were differences in the morphology of these neurones between treated and untreated cultures. This study shows that the use of 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine and serum- free medium can produce a neurone-enriched culture. However, the dopaminergic neurone population present in these cultures appeared to be morphologically dissimilar to those found in control cultures as neurites were retracted and the cell somas of these cells appeared enlarged. These results provide information on the effects of astrocytes on dopaminergic neurones in ventral mesencephalic cultures and thus have implications for transplantation in Parkinson's disease.
DORDRECHT
0300-4864
Grant Details