Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Hubner, F; O'Neil, T; Cashman, KD; Arendt, EK;
2010
January
European Food Research and Technology
The influence of germination conditions on beta-glucan, dietary fibre and phytate during the germination of oats and barley
Validated
()
Optional Fields
Barley Beta-glucan Dietary fibre Malting Oats Phytate PHYTIC ACID FUNCTIONAL-PROPERTIES CHEMICAL-COMPOSITION FOOD INGREDIENTS CEREALS COMPONENTS GRAIN POLYSACCHARIDES ABSORPTION REDUCTION
231
27
35
This study aimed to quantify the changes caused by varying germination conditions on the contents of some bioactive compounds in barley and oats. Samples of the two grains were germinated at temperatures between 10 and 20 A degrees C for a period of 2-6 days, using a two-dimensional central composite design. The germination temperature had only minor effect in comparison with the germination time. Slight changes in the mineral content of the malts were observed, mainly caused by steeping. Phytate has been seen as an anti-nutritional compound, as it complexes minerals and lowers their bioavailability. The phytate content in barley malts was considerably lower than in the native kernels. Variations in the germination conditions did not have a significant effect on phytate content. In oats, degradation of phytate was significantly enhanced by prolonging the germination period. It was possible to retain the amounts of soluble dietary fibre, when short germination periods were applied. However, long germination periods caused an extensive breakdown of soluble dietary fibre, especially beta-glucan. The content of insoluble fibre, however, was increased by applying long germination periods for oat malts.
DOI 10.1007/s00217-010-1247-1
Grant Details