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Mason, L., Hogan, S., Lynch, AM., O'Sullivan, K., Lawlor, P., Kerry, J
2006
June
Animal Research
Quality characteristics of cured ham produced from Landrace and Duroc pigs fed restricted energy diets with and without alpha-tocopheryl acetate or green tea catechins
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compensatory growth ham breed pork quality alpha-tocopheryl acetate tea catechins grass LONGISSIMUS-DORSI MUSCLE VITAMIN-E SENSORY QUALITY COOKED HAMS STABILITY SUPPLEMENTATION PORK STORAGE PERFORMANCE WEIGHT
55
323
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The effects of compensatory growth diets with and without antioxidant ( alpha- tocopheryl acetate (alpha- TA) or green tea catechin ( GTC)) inclusion on the quality characteristics of cured hams were examined. Compensatory growth diets combined periods of restricted dietary energy intake ( incorporating grassmeal as a source of low metabolisable energy) followed by periods of high energy intake. Landrace or Duroc pigs (n = 72) were allocated to one of six experimental diets from 21 days post-weaning to 105 kg live weight. Dietary treatment did not influence any of the ham characteristics examined ( ham weight, cook loss, lipid oxidation or CIE colour values). Lipid oxidation, determined as 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS values), and CIE colour ( L*, a* and b*) values remained stable throughout refrigerated storage. Brine solution additives may have contributed to oxidative stability and masked any dietary effects. In contrast, breed significantly affected ham quality. Lipid oxidation was lower in hams from Duroc pigs. Redness ( a* values) was more intense in Landrace hams than equivalent Duroc samples. No differences were observed between breeds for CIE L* and b* values or percentage cook loss. The quality characteristics of cured hams were influenced to a greater extent by breed than by dietary intervention through compensatory growth. Inclusion of alpha-TA or GTC did not affect the quality or storage stability of cured hams.
DOI 10.1051/animres:2006018
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