Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Kenosi, M;O'Toole, JM;Hawkes, GA;Hutch, W;Low, E;Wall, M;Boylan, GB;Ryan, CA;Dempsey, EM
2018
March
Journal Of Perinatology
Monitoring cerebral oxygenation of preterm infants using a neonatal specific sensor
Validated
WOS: 7 ()
Optional Fields
PREMATURE-INFANTS HEMORRHAGE SATURATION OXIMETERS PHANTOM NIRS
38
264
270
Introduction Cerebral oxygenation (rcSO(2)) monitoring in preterm infants may identify periods of cerebral hypoxia or hyperoxia. We hypothesised that there was a relationship between rcSO(2) values and short term outcome in infants of GA < 32weeks. Methods RcSO(2) values were recorded for the first 48 h of life using an INVOS monitor with a neonatal sensor. The association between cranial ultrasound scan measured brain injury and rcSO(2) was assessed. Results 120 infants were included. Sixty-nine percent (83) of infants had a normal outcome (no IVH, no PVL, and survival at 1 month); less than one-quarter, 22% (26), had low grade IVH 1 or 2 (moderate outcome); and 9% (11) of infants had a severe outcome (IVH >= 3, PVL or died before 1 month age). rcSO(2) values were lower for infants GA < 28weeks when compared with those GA 28-32, p < 0.001. There was no difference in absolute rcSO(2) values between the three outcome groups but a greater degree of cerebral hypoxia was associated with preterm infants who had low grade 1 or 2 IVH. Conclusion Infants of GA < 28 weeks have lower cerebral oxygenation in the first 2 days of life. A greater degree of hypoxia was seen in infants with grade 1 or 2 haemorrhage. Normative ranges need to be gestation specific.
NEW YORK
0743-8346
10.1038/s41372-017-0007-5
Grant Details