Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Johns EJ;
1985
August
Clinical Science
Role of the renal nerves in modulating renin release during pressure reduction at the feline kidney.
Validated
()
Optional Fields
69
2
185
195
Experiments were undertaken in pentobarbitone-anaesthetized cats to determine how reflex activation of the renal nerves altered the responsiveness of the kidney to release renin during reductions in renal perfusion pressure. Reflex activation of the renal nerves was achieved by reducing carotid sinus perfusion pressure by 30 mmHg, which increased systemic blood pressure. During this period renal perfusion pressure was regulated at control levels and neither renal blood flow nor glomerular filtration rate changed, but there was a significant decrease in sodium excretion and increase in renin secretion. Renal denervation abolished both these latter responses. Renal perfusion pressure reduction, by 25-30 mmHg, had no effect on renal blood flow or glomerular filtration rate but significantly decreased sodium excretion and increased renin secretion. Simultaneous reduction of carotid sinus and renal perfusion pressures had no effect on renal blood flow or glomerular filtration rate, decreased sodium excretion, and the magnitude of the increase in renin secretion was significantly greater than that obtained with reduction in renal perfusion pressure alone. Renal denervation abolished the increase in renin secretion during these manoeuvres. During atenolol administration, renal haemodynamics and sodium excretion responses to renal pressure reduction were similar to those obtained in the absence of the drug. Renin secretion was increased, but significantly less than in the absence of atenolol. Simultaneous carotid sinus and renal pressure reductions during atenolol administration had no effect on renal haemodynamics, reduced sodium excretion and increased renin secretion, the magnitude of which was significantly greater than that recorded with only renal pressure reduction in the presence of atenolol. Direct electrical stimulation of the renal nerves, at frequencies which caused a 5-10% reduction in renal blood flow, did not change glomerular filtration rate, decreased sodium excretion by 30% and increased the rate of renin secretion twofold. In the presence of atenolol, such renal nerve stimulation reduced renal blood flow to the same degree, did not change filtration rate, decreased sodium excretion by 37% but did not change renin secretion. These results show that the magnitude of the release of renin in response to renal pressure reduction is dependent on activity within the renal nerves, being blunted after denervation, and enhanced during reflex activation of the renal nerves.
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