Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
O'Connor, H;MacSharry, J;Bueso, YF;Lindsay, S;Kavanagh, EL;Tangney, M;Clyne, M;Saldova, R;McCann, A
2018
September
Discovery Medicine
Resident Bacteria in Breast Cancer Tissue: Pathogenic Agents or Harmless Commensals?
Validated
WOS: 7 ()
Optional Fields
POTENTIAL ROLE HELICOBACTER-PYLORI INFECTIOUS MASTITIS ANTIBIOTIC USE DNA-DAMAGE IN-VIVO MICROBIOTA CELLS MILK INFLAMMATION
26
93
102
Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women. Recent evidence identifies a unique microbiome in breast tissue; a site previously thought to be sterile. The identification that this microbiome varies considerably from healthy subjects to cancer patients has prompted investigations into the role of specific bacterial species in oncogenesis. Indeed, certain bacteria have been shown to aid cancer development in vitro by promoting genomic instability, invasion, and chemotherapy resistance. However, the in vivo role of the breast microbiome in cancer appears to be more complex, involving numerous interactions between its constituent species and host cells. As such, reduced abundances of species which exert a protective effect against oncogenesis have come into focus and there is an emerging consensus that states of microbial dysbiosis, in which the normal balance of bacterial species is altered, can contribute to the development of cancer. This review summarizes the findings to date from the available literature pertaining to the microbiome in breast cancer and outlines areas worthy of further investigation.
TIMONIUM
1539-6509
Grant Details