Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Geaney F.;Fitzgerald S.;Harrington J.;Kelly C.;Greiner B.;Perry I.
2015
January
Preventive Medicine Reports
Nutrition knowledge, diet quality and hypertension in a working population
Validated
Optional Fields
Cross-sectional study Diet Hypertension Knowledge Nutrition assessment Workplace
2
105
113
2015 . Objective: To examine if employees with higher nutrition knowledge have better diet quality and lower prevalence of hypertension. Method: Cross-sectional baseline data were obtained from the complex workplace dietary intervention trial, the Food Choice at Work Study. Participants included 828 randomly selected employees (18-64. years) recruited from four multinational manufacturing workplaces in Ireland, 2013. A validated questionnaire assessed nutrition knowledge. Food Frequency Questionnaires (FFQ) measured diet quality from which a DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) score was constructed. Standardised digital blood pressure monitors measured hypertension. Results: Nutrition knowledge was positively associated with diet quality after adjustment for age, gender, health status, lifestyle and socio-demographic characteristics. The odds of having a high DASH score (better diet quality) were 6 times higher in the highest nutrition knowledge group compared to the lowest group (OR. =. 5.8, 95% CI 3.5 to 9.6). Employees in the highest nutrition knowledge group were 60% less likely to be hypertensive compared to the lowest group (OR. =. 0.4, 95% CI 0.2 to 0.87). However, multivariate analyses were not consistent with a mediation effect of the DASH score on the association between nutrition knowledge and blood pressure. Conclusion: Higher nutrition knowledge is associated with better diet quality and lower blood pressure but the inter-relationships between these variables are complex.
2211-3355
10.1016/j.pmedr.2014.11.008
Grant Details