Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Moran, L;Barron, LJR;Wilson, SS;O'Sullivan, MG;Kerry, JP;Prendiville, R;Moloney, AP
2020
September
Journal of The Science of Food and Agriculture
Effect of pelvic suspension and post-mortem ageing on the quality of three muscles fromHolstein Friesianbulls and steers
Validated
WOS: 3 ()
Optional Fields
MEAT QUALITY CARCASS SUSPENSION MAJOR MUSCLES SHEAR FORCE BEEF TENDERNESS PALATABILITY TRAITS CATTLE BULLS
BACKGROUND The use of bulls rather than steers from the dairy herd offers a more profitable and environmentally friendly option; however, the beef eating quality from bulls is an issue of concern. This study assessed the effect of two tenderization techniques - pelvic suspension and ageing - on three different muscles of Holstein Friesian males from two different production systems. RESULTS The results indicate that a production system based on steers slaughtered at 24 months (S24) produced beef with better eating quality than from bulls slaughtered at 19 months (B19) when tenderization techniques were not applied. Instrumental texture oflongissimus thoracisandgluteus mediusmuscles was improved with ageing and/or pelvic suspension, with both tenderization techniques exerting greater impact on B19 meat. No differences were found insemitendinosus muscle due to suspension method, whereas ageing for longer than 14 days decreased its instrumental tenderness. Sensory results indicate that, after 14 days of ageing, panellists still preferred meat from S24, and they could differentiate between pelvic and traditional suspension. CONCLUSION Tenderization methodologies should be optimized for each production system and muscle; however, both panel and instrumental texture results indicate that eating quality of beef from either production systems is acceptable after 14 days of ageing, or even earlier if the suspension method is applied.
HOBOKEN
0022-5142
10.1002/jsfa.10804
Grant Details