Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
McGreal, G. T.,Joy, A.,Manning, B.,Kelly, J. L.,O'Donnell, J. A.,Kirwan, W. W. O.,Redmond, H. P.;
2002
World Journal of Surgery
Antiseptic wick: Does it reduce the incidence of wound infection following appendectomy?
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26
55
631
634631
The role of prophylactic antibiotics is well established for contaminated wounds, but the use of antiseptic wound wicks is controversial. The aim of this work was to study the potential use of wound wicks to reduce the rate of infection following appendectomy. This prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at a university hospital in the department of surgery. The subjects were patients undergoing appendectomy for definite acute appendicitis. They were randomized by computer to primary subcuticular wound closure or use of an antiseptic wound wick. For the latter, ribbon gauze soaked in povidone-iodine was placed between interrupted nylon skin sutures, Wicks were soaked daily and removed on the fourth postoperative day. All patients received antibiotic prophylaxis. They, were reviewed while in hospital and 4 weeks following operation for evidence of wound infection. The main outcome measures were wound infection, wound discomfort, and cosmetic result. The overall wound infection rate was 8.6% (15/174). In patients with wound wicks it was 11.6% (10/86) compared to 5.6% (5/88) in those whose wounds were closed by subcuticular sutures (p = NS). We concluded that the use of wound wicks was not associated with decreased wound infection rates following appendectomy. Subcuticular closure is therefore appropriate in view of its greater convenience and safety.The role of prophylactic antibiotics is well established for contaminated wounds, but the use of antiseptic wound wicks is controversial. The aim of this work was to study the potential use of wound wicks to reduce the rate of infection following appendectomy. This prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at a university hospital in the department of surgery. The subjects were patients undergoing appendectomy for definite acute appendicitis. They were randomized by computer to primary subcuticular wound closure or use of an antiseptic wound wick. For the latter, ribbon gauze soaked in povidone-iodine was placed between interrupted nylon skin sutures, Wicks were soaked daily and removed on the fourth postoperative day. All patients received antibiotic prophylaxis. They, were reviewed while in hospital and 4 weeks following operation for evidence of wound infection. The main outcome measures were wound infection, wound discomfort, and cosmetic result. The overall wound infection rate was 8.6% (15/174). In patients with wound wicks it was 11.6% (10/86) compared to 5.6% (5/88) in those whose wounds were closed by subcuticular sutures (p = NS). We concluded that the use of wound wicks was not associated with decreased wound infection rates following appendectomy. Subcuticular closure is therefore appropriate in view of its greater convenience and safety.
0364-23130364-2313
://WOS:000175472900022://WOS:000175472900022
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